Which Republicans are most likely to think the election was stolen? Those who dislike Democrats and don’t mind white nationalists.

2021-03-26T15:20:25+00:00

Washington Post Jan Zilinsky, Jonathan Nagler and Joshua Tucker January 19, 2020 Read Detailed Analysis Behind the Article It's not uncommon for a defeated party to find a narrative to explain a loss, but what is unusual is for a candidate to claim they didn't lose at all. Following the 2020 presidential election, CSMaP researchers fielded a study, which found that over 70 percent of Republicans agreed with former President Trump's claim that he won more votes than President Biden. The researchers explain the study and the different predictors of belief. [...]

Which Republicans are most likely to think the election was stolen? Those who dislike Democrats and don’t mind white nationalists.2021-03-26T15:20:25+00:00

Twitter put warning labels on hundreds of thousands of tweets. Our research examined which worked best.

2021-03-26T15:24:32+00:00

Washington Post Megan A. Brown, Zeve Sanderson, Jonathan Nagler, Richard Bonneau and Joshua Tucker December 9, 2020 Read Detailed Analysis Behind the Article In the aftermath of the 2020 election, Twitter CEO, Jack Dorsey and Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg testified before the Senate about misinformation during the election. Dorsey was questioned about Twitter's decision to label Trump's tweets as "false or misleading", which some accused as a bias against conservatives and others argued allowed the misinformation to spread. At CSMaP, we investigated these efforts to stop misinformation and found that even labeled tweets continued to [...]

Twitter put warning labels on hundreds of thousands of tweets. Our research examined which worked best.2021-03-26T15:24:32+00:00

How Trump impacts harmful Twitter speech: A case study in three tweets

2021-03-15T17:30:30+00:00

Brookings Megan Brown and Zeve Sanderson October 22, 2020 The use of offensive speech on the internet leading to the rise of political events on the ground is a dynamic that is familiar to researchers of online speech. But what about Trump's online speech? At CSMaP, we examined three tweets from Trump and tracked whether they had an impact on the quality of other online speech and whether the effect was negative. Our findings highlight the challenges that platforms face leading up to, and in the aftermath of the election.

How Trump impacts harmful Twitter speech: A case study in three tweets2021-03-15T17:30:30+00:00

It’s not easy for ordinary citizens to identify fake news

2020-04-30T14:43:55+00:00

Washington Post Zeve Sanderson, Kevin Aslett, Will Godel, Nathaniel Persily, Jonathan Nagler, Richard Bonneau and Joshua Tucker  April 7, 2020 How good are people at sifting out fake news? In a collaboration between the NYU Center for Social Media and Politics and the Stanford Cyber Policy Center (supported by the Hewlett Foundation), we’ve been investigating whether ordinary individuals...

It’s not easy for ordinary citizens to identify fake news2020-04-30T14:43:55+00:00

Shut down social media if you don’t like terrorism?

2019-10-08T13:17:20+00:00

Washington Post Joshua Tucker April 23, 2019 In the aftermath of Sunday’s violent terrorist attacks in Sri Lanka, the Sri Lankan government shut down access to social media sites as the investigation into the bombings proceeded. News reports listed Facebook — including its WhatsApp and Instagram platforms — YouTube, Snapchat and Viber...

Shut down social media if you don’t like terrorism?2019-10-08T13:17:20+00:00

Who was most likely to share fake news in 2016? Seniors.

2019-10-08T00:35:30+00:00

The Washington Post Andy Guess, Jonathan Nagler, Joshua A Tucker January 9, 2019 This week, the New York Times broke the news that Democratic activists posted misleading Facebook pages and Twitter feeds during the 2017 U.S. Senate race in Alabama. That’s just the latest iteration in the ongoing saga of online disinformation and “fake news” since the 2016 U.S. presidential election...

Who was most likely to share fake news in 2016? Seniors.2019-10-08T00:35:30+00:00

What’s the strategy of Russia’s Internet trolls? We analyzed their tweets to find out.

2019-10-08T00:39:18+00:00

The Washington Post Franziska Roescher, Leon Yin, Richard Bonneau, Jonathan Nagler, and Joshua A Tucker November 19, 2018 As U.S. citizens cast their ballots in this month’s midterm election, Facebook announced its suspicions that the Russia-based Internet Research Agency (IRA) was attempting to interfere. But what, exactly, was the online strategy of this “troll farm” that special counsel Robert S. Mueller III had already indicted in connection...

What’s the strategy of Russia’s Internet trolls? We analyzed their tweets to find out.2019-10-08T00:39:18+00:00

Could anything – even Taylor Swift – boost the youth vote in 2018?

2019-10-08T01:11:18+00:00

The Washington Post Jen Leighley and Jonathan Nagler October 18, 2018 Last week, with a post on Instagram, Taylor Swift urged young people to vote. She specifically endorsed two candidates, explained why she voted for them, and suggested that others should rely on their values in deciding how to vote...

Could anything – even Taylor Swift – boost the youth vote in 2018?2019-10-08T01:11:18+00:00

Why don’t Trump voters feel betrayed? Because they’re getting what they wanted.

2019-10-08T00:46:40+00:00

The Washington Post Jan Zilinsky and Joshua A Tucker February 1, 2018 Why doesn’t President Trump’s base feel betrayed yet, as so many observers think it should? Pundits have argued that they would feel alienated by his State of the Union address...

Why don’t Trump voters feel betrayed? Because they’re getting what they wanted.2019-10-08T00:46:40+00:00