Twitter banned Marjorie Taylor Greene. That may not hurt her much.

2022-01-14T18:36:33+00:00

Washington Post Megan A. Brown and Maggie MacDonald January 14, 2022 Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) tweeted misinformation about coronavirus vaccines, and after repeated offenses like this, Twitter permanently suspended her personal account.  Similarly, Facebook briefly suspended Greene's account after she made the same post on their platform. Our researchers further discuss deplatforming politicians and whether that type of intervention works.

Twitter banned Marjorie Taylor Greene. That may not hurt her much.2022-01-14T18:36:33+00:00

What Happened When Twitter Halted Trending Topics in Ethiopia

2022-01-13T19:10:52+00:00

Slate Megan A. Brown and Tessa Knight January 13, 2022 Twitter announced they would halt Trends in Ethiopia, following the country's recent violence and year-long civil war. This intervention was intended to reduce the risk of coordinating further violence or harm. Our research found no discernible change in the volume of tweets or the prevalence of toxic and threatening speech, meaning the Twitter intervention may not have worked as intended. Our researchers go on to explain this phenomenon.

What Happened When Twitter Halted Trending Topics in Ethiopia2022-01-13T19:10:52+00:00

Trendless Fluctuation? How Twitter’s Ethiopia Interventions May (Not) Have Worked

2022-01-11T16:47:27+00:00

Tech Policy Press Megan A. Brown and Tessa Knight January 11, 2022 The escalating conflict in Ethiopia, has left thousands dead and displaced millions more. Previous reports and new documents leaked by Facebook whistleblower, Frances Haugen, illustrate how social media is fueling ethnic-based violence in Ethiopia. Our researchers discuss how Twitter and other social media interventions are not having the intended effect.

Trendless Fluctuation? How Twitter’s Ethiopia Interventions May (Not) Have Worked2022-01-11T16:47:27+00:00

A Modest Ox: Examining Two Approaches to Testing Crowdsourced Fact Checking

2021-12-10T20:44:59+00:00

Tech Policy Press Zeve Sanderson and Joshua A. Tucker December 10, 2021 In a recent study, we tested whether crowd-sourced fact checking works or not and what we find is that crowds perform best when limited to those with high political knowledge and when using complex machine learning algorithms, but no approach reaches the level of a single professional fact checker. Our researchers discuss these findings at length in this piece.

A Modest Ox: Examining Two Approaches to Testing Crowdsourced Fact Checking2021-12-10T20:44:59+00:00

How to fix social media? Start with independent research.

2021-12-01T18:02:01+00:00

Brookings Institute Nathaniel Persily and Joshua A. Tucker December 1, 2021 To better understand the effects of social media, researchers need better access to the platform' 'data. And researcher access is only one component of a larger transparency agenda, and transparency is only one aspect of tech regulation.

How to fix social media? Start with independent research.2021-12-01T18:02:01+00:00

Academic Researchers Need Access to the Facebook Papers

2021-11-04T14:20:34+00:00

Slate Zeve Sanderson, Jonathan Nagler, & Joshua A. Tucker November 4, 2021 Despite the revelatory findings in the Facebook Papers, only 17 news outlets and government officials have access to them. Meaning that scholars, and other academics, aren't able to study them in-full. Our experts weigh in on how this affects future research.

Academic Researchers Need Access to the Facebook Papers2021-11-04T14:20:34+00:00

Twitter amplifies conservative politicians. Is it because users mock them?

2021-10-27T16:17:39+00:00

Washington Post Megan A. Brown, Jonathan Nagler and Joshua Tucker October 27, 2021 Twitter prioritizes content it thinks that you are more likely to engage with and these algorithms remain highly controversial, because in some cases they can promote harmful information. Our research suggests, an unlikely, but plausible reason that Twitter promotes conservative politics is because they get dunked on so much. Our data shows that conservative politicians in the United States are more likely than their peers to — in Twitter slang — be “ratioed.”

Twitter amplifies conservative politicians. Is it because users mock them?2021-10-27T16:17:39+00:00

Facebook, open your data trove: The lesson of whistleblower Frances Haugen

2021-10-05T14:24:25+00:00

New York Daily News Joshua Tucker & Jonathan Nagler October 5, 2021 Platforms have troves of research studying their societal impact and whistleblower, Frances Haugen claims Facebook knew the impact their platform had on fueling the spread of misinformation. The recent Facebook revelations, and the hearing taking place to investigate those allegations, show why it's critical for government to open that data to outsider researchers. Our co-directors, Joshua Tucker and Jonathan Nagler explain.

Facebook, open your data trove: The lesson of whistleblower Frances Haugen2021-10-05T14:24:25+00:00

Which Republicans are most likely to think the election was stolen? Those who dislike Democrats and don’t mind white nationalists.

2021-04-16T22:35:16+00:00

Washington Post Jan Zilinsky, Jonathan Nagler and Joshua Tucker January 19, 2021 Read Detailed Analysis Behind the Article It's not uncommon for a defeated party to find a narrative to explain a loss, but what is unusual is for a candidate to claim they didn't lose at all. Following the 2020 presidential election, CSMaP researchers fielded a study, which found that over 70 percent of Republicans agreed with former President Trump's claim that he won more votes than President Biden. The researchers explain the study and the different predictors of belief. [...]

Which Republicans are most likely to think the election was stolen? Those who dislike Democrats and don’t mind white nationalists.2021-04-16T22:35:16+00:00

This explains how social media can both weaken — and strengthen — democracy

2021-04-16T22:57:27+00:00

Washington Post Andrew Hamilton Joshua Tucker, Yannis TheoCharis, Maragret E. Roberts, and Pablo Barberá January 7, 2021 Social media itself is neither inherently democratic, nor nondemocratic. Instead, it lives in another space where political actors content for power. This explains how social media can bolster and weaken our democracy. CSMaP researchers discuss how social media in the hands of people opposed to liberal tenets can lead to events like the Capital Riot of January 6.

This explains how social media can both weaken — and strengthen — democracy2021-04-16T22:57:27+00:00